Prof Prash Sanders

Prash graduated with honours from the University of Adelaide in 1994. He undertook Physician and Cardiology training at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. He then undertook clinical training in Cardiac Electrophysiology at the Royal Melbourne Hospital under the mentorship of Professor Jonathan Kalman. During this time he also completed his PhD through the University of Melbourne. His PhD studies entitled "Electrical and mechanical remodelling of the atria associated with atrial arrhythmias" was awarded numerous accolades including the Heart Rhythm Society Young Investigator Award (2002), Commendation for the Victorian Premier's Award (2003), Finalist for the Ralph Reader Award from the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (2002) and Finalist for the Samuel A. Levine Young Investigator Award from the American Heart Association (2001).

Following this Prash was awarded the prestigious Neil Hamilton Fairly Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Ralph Reader Fellowship from the National Heart Foundation to join the team of Professor Michel Haïssaguerre in Bordeaux, France. Professor Haïssaguerre is a pioneer in cardiac electrophysiology and has been responsible for the development of catheter ablation techniques for atrial fibrillation. This team has been at the forefront of ablation strategies for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. During a 3-4 year period with this group, Prash has developed a significant expertise in complex catheter ablation techniques used for the treatment of a variety of arrhythmias with a particular focus on atrial fibrillation. He has been responsible for significant contributions to the literature on the mechanisms of atrial fibrillation and the techniques for its ablation. During this time, he was awarded the Clinical Research Award from the Heart Rhythm Society in 2004.

In 2005 Prash returned to Adelaide and was appointed to the Knapman - National Heart Foundation Chair of Cardiology Research at the University of Adelaide and as Clinical Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Since then he has established a dedicated electrophysiology laboratory and group; this being a first for South Australia. This group has rapidly expanded and attracts fellows from all over the world. Prash's team has established themselves as one of the major electrophysiology groups in Australia with national and international recognition. This team has been at the forefront of ablation strategies for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Prash has published 25 book chapters, >260 publications and >700 abstracts during a research career spanning less than a decade. He was recently named the 2010 Australian Medical Researcher of the year under the age of 40. In 2013, he received a NHMRC Achievement award for the highest ranked Practitioner Award. The group receives regular funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, National Heart Foundation of Australia and the Australian Research Council.

Prash's interests are in all aspects of clinical cardiology with a particular focus in cardiac electrophysiology. He undertakes pacemaker implantation, cardiac defibrillator implantation, cardiac resynchronization, electrophysiology studies and ablation (in particular ablation of atrial fibrillation) and all device follow ups. Prash has admitting rights and undertakes procedures at the Royal Adelaide Hospital, Wakefield Hospital, St Andrew's Hospital and Ashford Hospital. He also has access appointments at the Repatriation General Hospital and Flinders Medical Centre. In addition to consulting at the Cardiovascular Centre, Prash visits Port Lincoln.

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  • Professor Sanders says...

     
    Atrial fibrillation is a consequence of several reversible risk factors - high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, sleep apnoea, and excessive alcohol. Your management of atrial fibrillation must include strict control of these risk factors.

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